Back to TV: The Mysteries of Laura

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Well, once again it’s been awhile. I didn’t watch that many movies and the ones I watched, weill, most of them weren’t any good. I’m still waiting for Pitch Perfect 2 to come out in Germany, and while I’m waiting I’m watching a lot of TV.

Let me introduce to you The Mysteries of Laura. It’s a crime comedy and I think it is worth watching. Why? themysteriesoflaura6Well, for one thing: Debra Messing. You know her from Will & Grace, of course, and so do I. I LOVED Grace Adler and now I’m loving Laura Diamond, because with some actors you love every character they play. I do think, though, that Laura is worth all the love. She’s a wonderfully quirky, and honest, and normal person. She messes up, she wears sneakers on the job, she’s a slob, but a lovely one.

We all know those cop shows of late where the cases are not as important as the personal life of the detective (think Rizzoli & Isles and Castle). This is one of those. While the cases are interesting enough, Laura’s personal life and her relationships to her colleagues are at the center of the show. She has twin boys (Charlie and Vincent Reina) who like to stir up their own messes, her father (Robert Klein) still tries to get Laura back with her ex (Josh Lucas) who happens to be her boss, and her partner (Laz Alonso) is looking on with a themysteriesoflaura7bemused smile.

While I mostly like the chemistry between the characters (including the slightly envious detective Meredith Bose [Janina Gavankar] and the gay assistent Max Carnegie [Max Jenkins]), I really could do without Captain Manchild, as Laura coined him. Josh Lucas is certainly a fine actor and he plays Laura’s ex certainly annoying enough – or maybe too annoying. While he still ranges within the parameters of love interest for Laura, as do most male guest stars on the show, he comes across as a little too chauvinist, a little too jealous of prospective boyfriends for Laura. If this show wasn’t a comedy, I would attest him stalker tendencies. It’s really not cute.

Apart from him, I would say the show is a good watch. It’s funny, Laura is delightful and messy and just vintage Debra Messing. And then there has already been the guest appearance of someone you might recognize:

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Insurgent (3D)

Insurgent (2015) by Robert Schwentke

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I must confess that I gave up on the books 200 pages into the second volume. It all turned too much into some sort of Twilight with Four becoming more important than Tris. I hate when that happens and I’m still in awe of Suzanne Collins and the way she developed Katniss Everdeen into a real person instead of just arm candy for Peeta.

insurgent1Given, Insurgent doesn’t quite give me the same feeling, but it disappointed on another level – a level it shares with the book, no doubt. The plot is… still no more convincing. It actually got a little weirder and wilder and not in a good way.

Okay, let’s get back to what happens for a second:

Tris (Shailene Woodley), her brother Caleb (Ansel Elgort) and Four (Theo James) hide out with the Amity but are out of luck as the Dauntless are still hot on their heels. They are being found out and are just barely able to escape – back into the city. Tris’ only thought is that of revenge on Jeanine (Kate Winslet), Four is tumbling into a Family reunion with his abandoning mother (Naomi Watts), and Caleb leaves the two to follow his own beliefs. They bring him back to Erudite where he and Tris meet again when Jeanine insurgent3threatens to kill people if Tris does not surrender. She does and is forced to use her divergent powers to open a secret box that promises to either make things even worse or bring salvation to those hunted.

It’s a fast-paced movie with a lot of action and little time to ponder what is actually happening. Which is probably a good thing because not all of it is making sense. I find the big reveal quite questionable, probably because I never understood the faction-system to begin with. Or rather, I didn’t be lieve in its functionality, neither as  political system or as plausible post-apocalyptic basis for a plot. Well, I shouldn’t have worried, it’s just a smoke Screen. But what is revealed instead doesn’t make it any better, unfortunately.

insurgent2The movie is not all bad. But most of its story just doesn’t work for me. What still does and will always work, of course, is Kate Winslet. I love her portrait of evil Jeanine and am only sad that it’s come to an end now. I’ll miss her – or maybe I won’t depending on whether I’ll watch Allegiant.

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Rented: Much Ado About Nothing

Much Ado About Nothing (2012) by Joss Whedon

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I’m not sure if I told you how I came to love Shakespeare. I had tried to read Macbeth at some point and labored through three pages of it before throwing it into the corner not to pick it or him up again for years. And then I watched Much Ado About Nothing – Branagh’s version – and fell in love.

muchado2It’s still my favorite movie version, it’s still one of my favorite plays, it’ll always have a special place in my heart. And I would probably not have endeavored to watch a different version if it hadn’t been for this addition to the title: A film by Joss Whedon.

And then, of course, there was the casting of Amy Acker as Beatrice. One of my favorite actresses playing one of my favorite Shakespearean characters? Count me in.

And now I’ve watched it. In fact, I’m at this moment watching it a second time in one day. Oh, my goodness, what a ball, a blast, a festival of wit and comedy and noir elements that make this movie not better than Branagh’s, but different and wonderful.

I must confess that I couldn’t imagine anyone playing Much Ado differently, in each and every scene I had a flashback to the ’92-version. But slowly the actors of the Whedon-verse acted themselves into my conscious and I couldn’t resist their charm. I’m fascinated, I’m stumped, I can’t stop watching. And how do you even begin to resist Amy Acker?

Let me tell you something about Acker – she’s genius. In every part I’ve ever seen her, she not only amyacker2convinced me, she awed me with her talent. I loved her as Doctor Saunders/Whiskey in Dollhouse, and I’m madly in love with Root in Person of Interest. She’s just so special in every role, she’s amazing.

But she’s not the only one in this brilliantly cast Whedon-family adaptation of Shakespeare. I never liked Alexis Denisof better than when he played Benedick, he’s earnest and smart and comical when he’s told that Beatrice loves him. Such an honest performance. I loved Fran Kranz in Dollhouse and I love him as Claudio. And then there’re Nathan Fillion as Dogberry and Tom Lenk as Verges and, hell, they’re the funniest thing – yes, funnier than Michael Keaton and Ben Elton even.

muchado4I guess, I have one thing to criticize, though. While I first thought it refreshing to see Riki Lindhome cast as Conrade, I feel that casting Conrade with a male actor in this version would have been even better. Making Don John (Sean Maher) a gay villain – not a caricatured man who is evil because he’s limited to his gayness, but just a villain who happens to be gay… That would have been even more interesting than having a Shakespeare character emasculated.

Apart from this, I simply love Whedon doing Shakespeare. But then, has there ever been a thing Joss Whedon has done that I didn’t love?

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The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1 by Francis Lawrence (2014)

mockingjay1.1The beginning of the end – but we’re already very familiar with this kind of thing, aren’t we? I mean the splitting of the last volume of a book series into two films. Potter had it, Twilight had it, and I don’t even want to know if Fifty Shades of Bad Entertainment will have it as well. But for Mockingjay, I feel it was the right decision, because part 1 is already amazing.

What happens?

Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence) has been rescued from the arena of her second hunger mockingjay1.2games and brought to District 13 where the rebels have gathered to wage war against the capitol. Katniss’ home District 12 has been destroyed but Gale Hawthorne (Liam Hemsworth) has saved some people, including Katniss’ mother (Paula Malcomson) and sister Prim (Willow Shields).

District 13 is a military district that works from underground since it had almost been completely destroyed during the war. People there live on essentials. Katniss agrees to be the symbol of the rebellion – the Mockingjay – if the captured tributes, including Peeta Mellark (Josh Hutcherson), are rescued at the earliest opportunity and given immunity.

After a sucessful rescue, Peeta tries to kill Katniss – he’s been brainwashed.

mockingjay1.3What fascinated me most with this part of the series is the barren look. While I would have wished for a more plush trainee center in the first film, the sparse set in this film fits District 13 perfectly. And it’s not just the set, the clothes and make-up of the characters reflect the military status of the district. To see Jennifer Lawrence basically without make-up… it makes her acting that much more intense. And not just hers. Once again, Julianne Moore just takes my breath away with her acting. She’s perfect as Alma Coin, the leader of District 13. Her posture shows miliatry stiffness and strength but she’s also sympathetic.

I think my favorite scene – probably everybody’s favorite scene – is the one with the group of young people (among them Natalie Dormer as Cressida) at the lake. It’s a stark difference to the scenes in the underground facility, it’s more relaxed and peaceful than the setting of the forest in the hunger games, and then there’s the song that Katniss sings – and it’s perfect. Jennifer Lawrence has a throaty, raw voice and it fits the situation and the song perfectly.

If there was something in this movie I didn’t like, I don’t remember it anymore because there were so many good things to remember, most of all the great acting by everyone involved. Effie Trinket mockingjay1.4(Elizabeth Banks) without her make-up, stripped bare of her capitol attitude and desperate and vulnarable is such a beautiful thing. Philip Seymour Hoffman in his last role as Plutarch Heavensbee… The casting is just amazing in this series and it makes this movie in particular sparkle more from within, because the setting doesn’t.

This movie series is getting better with each movie, while with the books, I will always think that the first one is the best. It makes for a nice contrast – and I’m so gonna own these wonderful movies on dvd.

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Back to tv: Supernatural

Supernatural (2005 – ) created by Eric Kripke

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If you spend any amount of time on tumblr – or more specifically tumblr fan blogs – you will have to fight the temptation of starting to watch a new tv show pretty much every day. I’m not kidding. If you’re a fan and you’re following the blogs of other fans they will lure you to watch the shows they love and that you not yet share. And that’s why I bought the first season of Supernatural.

It is probably one of the most well-loved shows on tumblr (beside Dr. Who and Sherlock, perhaps) and so every now and then a half-naked Jensen Ackles will pop up even on my female-feminist-lesbian-centered blog. I’m not complaining (Ackles certainly can pull off the half-naked look), it’s part of being a fan on tumblr. And another part is to give into temptation and start watching shows, even though you already have a problem with keeping up with the shows you’re currently watching.

That’s the tumblr-issue.

supernatural1The Supernatural-issue is another.

The show is about two brothers, Dean (Ackles) and Sam Winchester (Jared Padalecki), who are searching for their father John (Jeffrey Dean Morgan) who had gone missing monster-hunting. And while they’re searching they do what the men in their family set out to do ever since the boys’ mother died: kill monsters. It’s a path of vengeance and righteousness until the family is finally reunited. But evil is never over.

One comparison is unavoidable – and even perpetuated by the show’s creators it seems: the one with Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Because Buffy set the standards of modern monster hunting, popcultural references and fast-paced dialogue. And as far as I’m concerned, Buffy is still leading in all those categories. But that doesn’t mean that I don’t like Supernatural. I find the closer look at folklore and urban legends very interesting. Buffy was not a one-trick pony but her focus was mainly on vampires – whether it was the search for enemies or boyfriend-material. Supernatural broadens the scope and fights all (evil) supernatural powers.

Having two brothers fighting evil is also something new. Usually the premise of supernatural4a show – that is not a family show – starts with bringing together a diverse pool of people. Sam and Dean are different, sure, but they’re also family and engage in their share of family drama. Their absentee father brings a third angle to the discussion – even when he’s not present.

And therein lies my issue with the show. While the monster-hunting and dark look of the show are great, the family drama gets a little boring at times. The search for their father is a necessary one but the discussion of family issues is repetitive. And, at the risk of repeating myself here, I just don’t find male drama all that interesting. The patriarchal narrative is alive and well in this story. Women fill the void of sometime-girlfriend and evil fiend (and sometimes there isn’t even that much of a difference between these stereotypes because, as we all know: evil is hot). While woman fulfills sinner and saint-roles, the man is engaged in a constant pissing contest with brother, father, male adversaries.

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Am I too harsh? I am. I knew that I would have issues with a story that is centered so entirely around male characters but I still started to watch it because… fans are so really good at making you share their fascination. And the show is not bad and I might yet watch more of it. It’s just that I don’t feel that culture has anything new to tell me about the adventures of the male profession. And I don’t even think that it is me who is so focused on the issue of gender, here. It is perpetuated by the makers, it is shoved down my throat, that male adventure is just different from female adventure, that the male will always be more interesting, more engaged in the extraordinary. There are still people who think that this holds true despite the evidence to the contrary. But I’m not buying – sometimes I’m renting – into this franchise. In the end, your gender is irrelevant, the only important thing is the story you tell me.

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Back to tv: The Closer

The Closer (2005-2012) created by James Duff

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As you can see, I’m only just starting on the show and have now watched the first two season. I have watched a couple of episodes on German tv (that’s how I came across it, after all) but watching stuff on German tv is tricky because it is all dubbed. For a show that relies so much on its main character and characterization in general this means: no accents. Yeah, you see where I’m going with this: watching The Closer without Brenda Leigh Johnson’s distinctive accent is kind of missing the point.

thecloser1It took me a while to even find out that Brenda had an accent and why everyone was acting the way they did around her – but I got there and decided it was time to watch the show in the original. And I’m not sorry I did. For once, I have always liked Kyra Sedgwick. I’m not sure where I saw her first (could have been Singles) but the moment I saw her I liked her and that hasn’t changed. For another, I’m partial to Jeffrey Deaver’s books and I recognized in Brenda Leigh Johnson what I like about his Kathryn Dance-series: the shrewd intelligence of a person who is good at reading people and using this to her advantage. I like people – if I’m not hating them with a passion. I like the complexity of us, the diversity and the sameness – and I like watching people concerning themselves with people. And this is what The Closer is about.

That isn’t to say that it’s all good. As you can easily see in the pictures, the show has a gender-challenge. The challenge being that of a woman in a man’s world and a lot of what is going on in the first season made me angry. The feeling of Brenda Leigh Johnson having to fight old boys club-windmills was prevalent and it irked me. Fortunately, they eased up on this in the second season. I’m thecloser3not saying that this isn’t a real issue, it is, but sometimes real issues make me so mad in real life that I don’t want to deal with them in an imaginary world, or at least not too much. The glass ceiling exists, Brenda Leigh likes to ignore it but she doesn’t have to do this in every episode for women to feel empowered, or for everyone to acknowledge that it exists.

It is difficult for me to watch a show with so many male characters, I’m not going to lie to you about this. Fortunately, most of them are if not likable then at least characterized convincingly which is due in great part to having good actors play them. I really hate Will Pope, for example, the way he strings Brenda along, the way he sometimes hangs her out to dry and always demands that she’d do her job by yesterday and then criticizes her for how she does it. And J.K Simmons is just the actor who can still make Pope annoyingly sweet. You can see why she fell for him but also why he’s bad for her and her career. And the other male characters are portrayed and cast just as well as he is.

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The show has very strong assets to convey police work. the acting, the writing, the characterization. It’s a good show, a clever cop-show while also not being a typical cop-show. Then, of course, there’s the fact that I’m a sucker for a Southern accent – and beautiful women. And although most of the characters are male, there is Kyra Sedgwick and there is also (at least so far) Gina Ravera and seeing those two walk onto a crime scene… definately worth watching.

Back to tv: Once Upon a Time

(The purple stuff is not the Gay Menace it’s magic – okay, even I noticed the contradiction in that statement…)

A tv show about fairy tales, I thought, this is either a very bad or a very good idea. I am still not sure which it is but I am watching every week now. The premise goes as follows:

The Evil Queen (Lana Parrilla) hates Snow White (Ginnifer Goodwin) and wants to destroy her happiness with Prince Charming (Josh Dallas) – actually she wants to destroy everybody’s happy ending. So she curses her enemies to live in a land without magic where she reigns. But the Charmings are having a baby and by prophecy this baby is to rid everyone of the curse – in 28 years. They put her in a magic wardrobe and Emma – thus the Charming’s off-spring’s name – is transported to our world, somewhere in Maine. Not far from that small town that magically appeared shortly after by the name of Storybrooke where all the characters from our favorite fairy tales are now living.

28 years pass – only in Storybrooke they don’t really pass because time has stopped – and Henry (Jared Gilmore) appears at Emma Swan’s (Jennifer Morrison) door, telling her that he is her son and that she has to safe everyone in Storybrooke from the Evil Queen, his adoptive mother, Regina Mills. Emma comes to Storybrooke and as she decides to stay, the clocks in Storybrooke start ticking again.

The story is told in flashbacks that bring us back to Fairytale Land and the story that is taking place in Storybrooke. We get to know the characters and who they were in a magical world and who they have – unknowingly – become.

The concept is actually quite fascinating, especially from a feminist perspective: most of the main players are women because fairy tales are so often concerned with them. The love/hate relationship between Regina and Snow White/Mary Margaret is as much at the core of it as the antagonism between Regina and Emma – who, after all, lay claims to the same boy as son – and the love between Snow and Charmin’ who in Storybrooke are a school teacher and a man in a coma (don’t worry he wakes only to learn that he has married the wrong girl).

With a lot of characters there come a lot of stories to be told. The show does not exclusively tell classic fairy tales either but dips into Wonderland, Neverland and also brings Victor Frankenstein (David Anders) to the (operating) table.

While the story as conducted story is quite fascinating, the handling of characters is sometimes disappointing. It seems that the two villains are treated differently by the writer’s on the ground of gender, while Regina gets the cold shoulder treatment, Rumplestiltskin (Robert Carlyle) is forgiven his misdeeds because he is loved by someone. The writer’s also like to throw love-interests at Emma Swan, white male love interests while a lot of fans would rather see her with the Evil Queen, Regina, because these two have actual chemistry.

There are a lot of ships sailing under the Ouat (Once Upon a Time) banner, there are very few characters who are not in some way linked to each other and the fans love making up new ships (some of them not even romantic). One thing is sure: the fans are invested – and I count myself among them. Though my ship is the Red Beauty (that’s Ruby/Red Riding Hood and Belle/Beauty to you).

If you find the time, have a look. If for nothing else, the retelling and changing of fairy tales we’ve grown up with, is fascinating. And there’s room for plenty interpretation.

Back to tv: Warehouse 13

I came to realize something this year which may have been true before but never so clear as now: tv shows are better than movies. I have been very disappointed this year by the lack of really good movies coming out (especially those that ran under the big sail of “blockbuster” were disappointing). So, I turned to tv a lot and that’s where the really good stories were told this year – and, of course, before this year as many of the really great shows this year did not just start. One of those great shows is Warehouse 13.

The warehouse itself is a secret hiding place for artefacts that is protected by a secret society that operates worldwide. Warehouse 13 is situated in South Dakota and Secret Service agents Bering (Joanne Kelly) and Lattimer (Eddie McClintock) are being recruited to secure artefacts that are being used to create mischief and store them in the warehouse (“snag ’em, bag ’em, tag ’em”). They work under Artie Nielson (Saul Rubinek), an elderly agent with a temper and a past, and with young Claudia Donovan (Allison Scagliotti), who’s a wizz at the keys and has quite a mouth on her. The warehouse’s keeper is Mrs. Frederic (CCH Pounder), a woman who is closer attached to the warehouse than anyone wants to admit or think about.

One great thing about this show is the fact that we have actually more female than male characters – and yes, this is important because it is such a rare occurance in tv (and movies…). It is an ensemble show and the chemistry is delicious, it’s fun, it’s quirky, and at times silly. The whole show has an undeniable quality of fan-hysteria. You just have to look at the long list of science fiction related guest stars: Kate Mulgrew, Jeri Ryan, Brent Spiner, Lindsay Wagner, Rene Auberjonois to name a few – and you know: here are people who love science fiction.

The light-heartedness is broken by great dramatic story-telling under the helm of a personal favorite: Jane Espenson whose credits cover many a Josh Whedon project, plus Battlestar Galactica, plus Gilmore Girls, etc. No wonder this show is AWESOME.

And then there is subtext, and I don’t mean anything to do with Pete and Myka. Love finds nerdy agent Bering in the second season with villain H.G. Wells (yes, the writer who is coincidentally a woman – her brother provided the mustache). Well, H.G. turns out less the villain and more of someone who is hurting a lot – and really we would forgive Jaime Murray’s lovely face just about anything.

There is a lot to love about the show, and believe you me: I love it all! (There is actually not a single thing I do not like about this show… nothing to rant about… hell, I feel a little bit cheated by the lack of wrong on this show…)

Back to tv: Body of Proof

Dana Delany. I don’t know if you know who she is but if you don’t you should feel like you missed out on something. At the moment, I am so obsessed with her that I am actually watching bits and pieces (mostly lesbian bits and pieces) of Desperate Housewives and I was never into that show. Anyway, when I was at my parents’ I caught onto this show and I think it is great.

BoP is a crime show, nothing new there. To me, it feels like a mix between Bones and Rizzoli & Isles. It’s about Medical Examiner Dr. Megan Hunt (Delany) who was a brilliant neuro surgeon until five years ago when she had an accident, leaving her with paralysis in her right hand, which is only acting up so often but she killed a patient because she still worked on brains afterward. Her marriage came undone in the aftermath and her lawyer husband, Todd (Jeffrey Nordling), got full custody of daughter Lacey (Mary Mouser). Megan changed fields and is now an equally brilliant ME. She is making up for that one patient she killed by finding out what killed others.

You guessed it, the main appeal on this show for me is Dana Delany who plays the lead (a role that has actually been written for a woman 20 years younger than the woman playing her – which makes me really happy). But there are other factors that make this show great: two more bright, strong, and beautiful women among the main players, for once. And one of them is none other than Jeri Ryan. Yes, I have admired her since her days on Star Trek: Voyager and she was the main reason for me to tune into Boston Public. I really like her, not just because she has incredible bone structure but because she can act. Go figure.

The chemistry between the characters works great. It’s an ensemble show and the characters are all likable. They have their differences (especially with Megan) but at the end of the day they are a team.

So, is this the perfect crime show we have all been waiting for? Certainly not. There are at least two factors that get on my nerves some: while the chemistry among the characters is great, it seems to slip when these people get involved – with each other or anybody else. The premise is, of course, that Megan and her partner, Peter Dunlop (Nicholas Bishop), a medical detective, have it in for each other. But they don’t want to go there too fast or too obviously, so, mainly everybody they are dating is kinda wrong for them anyway. Still, they will probably not make it anyways because the writers seem to have made a virginal unapproachable out of Megan. She is so clever, so witty, so above it all that there’s no man good enough for her.

Pretty much the same goes for Megan’s boss, Kate Murphy (Ryan). She actually went out with Megan’s ex-husband and this relationship created a rupture between the women that I could have done without. Would I rather dig Megan and Kate together? Of course. But not just because they are both women, but because they seem to genuinely like each other, they have awesome chemistry. I know this is not gonna happen but making enemies out of these two over a man… that was some bad idea.

The other bad idea is that the powers that be seem to shuffle episodes around. Sometimes the storyline seems off, and Kate was sexting Todd before they had actually met. Weird and confusing that one. What little character development there is seems to go back and forth because of this and I don’t really see why they are doing this.

Despite these faults, the show is good. And it is so good because of the strong female characters and the affirmation of strong female characters that can totally hold their own. These women don’t play second fiddle to anybody and it’s good to see a cop show where the female count actually (almost) equals the male. Why is that so important? Because it repesents life.

Picture left shows Sonja Sohn as Sam Baker.

Back to tv: Battlestar Galactica

Yeah, I know it’s been awhile since this show ran – I don’t even mean the original series but the reboot. But, y’know, I am just discovering it for the first time. And I am more than annoyed that I did not watch it when it aired. Seriously, there is no reason why I shouldn’t have watched it. We watched some of the original series at home when I was a kid, I am also partial to the Star Trek franchise  – but I didn’t watch it. Even when Lucy Lawless joined the cast I refused. I think it has something to do with me not seeing myself as a science-fiction fan. I always denied being a fantasy fan also – I am not sure why that is because my dvd collection clearly belies both these claims… Well, these last few years taught me better than to deny my passions any longer and hence I am free to explore.

I have just ordered the first half of the second season and so I am rewatching season 1. Hell, what a premise:

The twelve colonies of Kobol destroyed, billions dead, and only about 50,000 humans left. And why? Because technology proved its superiority over its master and created – well, mainly those incredible specimen on the left: cylons (Tricia Helfer, Lucy Lawless, Grace Park). Advanced toaster ovens with the one thought: to destroy mankind. I love when our own creations come back to bite us in the behind. I am also fascinated by the premise of how scared we are of machines taking over. I also watching Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles. The same premise, machines are taking over.

But while in Terminator the battle over earth is still on, President Laura Roslin (Mary MacDonnell) explaines slowly to the men who want to go on fighting: “The war is over. And we lost.” And here is one other strength of this show: equality among the genders. Everybody is called “sir” (okay, one could have come up with a less gender-partial nomer than the standard male), everybody is on an equal footing. I like the democratic process within the story telling. And Laura Roslin is one hell of a President!

She is not the only stong female character, though. We have Starbuck, Boomer, and Six to back her up. And even the male characters are not half-baked. Yes, there is some machismo with all the phallic imagery that pervades weaponry but the pheromones are just as widely spread as the testosterone is, so all is good. So far.

I am really looking forward to watching this show (so, no spoilers if you want to comment, please). From what I have seen from the show so far, I can only ask: why only four seasons?

Update: I might have to take some of what I said back. Why? Rape as plot-device. I hate it! I watched the first half of the 2nd season now and the Pegasus-crew seems to feel that raping a cylon-agent is standard operating procedure… and this under the command of a woman! I cannot even fathom how disgusted I am by this plot. And I am amazed that they try to sell it to us… gosh, thank you, dear writers, for destroying another great show with a predictable storyline. I am so saddened by this, I don’t have words.