Resident Evil: Afterlife (3D)

Resident Evil: Afterlife (2010) by Paul W.S. Anderson

So, here we go again. Another – and possibly the last – installation of the Resident Evil merchandise has arrived and one of the best things is this:

No, not the picture per se (though, honest, I love it) but the fact that Ali Larter’s character Claire (is it just me or was her character named Clear/or Clea in the third movie?) made it back (even if a little brain-demaged). And those two ladies do not just “look good when wet,” they seriously kick ass which is just as good.

The plot, well, you know, this is Resident Evil: what do we need a story for? But since we have the makers from the first movie back it has a little more substance than the 2nd and 3rd movie of the series: Alice is back and she is lonely after having send her clones into Umbrella HQ in Hong Kong where they all died – some of them killed by the guy who is supposed to be the new T-virus supervillain (figures that they take a male to replace Alice). He is also the one that changes Alice back into a mere human – and she thanks him for it before they crash land with their superheli.

Afterwards Alice tries to find her girlfriend… er, other human beings alive who went to Alaska. She finds Claire who has amnesia and attacks her but this is still Alice we are talking about and she hog-ties Claire and they fly down the coast to find others alive. Which they do in L.A. which is pretty much only a big pile of ashes with one prison-building still intact and on the roof of this they find some new stereotypes… err, canon fodder… no, comrades-in-arms.

The basketball star, the mechanic, the starlet, the producer, the nameless asian-guy, and the voyeur were hoping that Alice and Claire came from the Arcadia, which is not a place in Alaska but a ship currently lying in convenient sight of the prison at the coast. But how to get from the prison to the ship when the prison is surrounded by… what else: zombies?

A prisoner the rest of the troop has taken may be the only hope, especially since there is a giant zombie of unknown origin helping his little brothers slamming in the front door and others of the little critters have already dug a tunnel to get into the prison (that’s new, isn’t it?). The prisoner claims to be military and it turns out he is Claire’s brother – which she naturally does not recognize (okay, this coincidence was a little too much, then again, those Redfields are fierce so maybe it is not so surprising that they both survived).

So, while breaking out of the prison some of our heroes get slashed into little pieces and fed to the zombies. But they somehow manage using the same tunnel the zombies have dug to get into the prison. They get to the Arcadia – just the two Redfields and Alice now – and discover that it is really just a trap built by Umbrella to get those last surviving humans to experiment on them. Seems the t-virus supervillain is not so super as Alice was since her blood and the t-virus bonded better than his blood does with the t-virus, so, now he needs her blood. Alice won’t give that up without a fight, naturally.

The ending is kinda strange and you should look at it yourself, I won’t spoil it for you. Just one word: confusing.

So, I liked it. Loads. Paul Anderson put some fun into the fourth RE movie. He plays well with stereotypes and serves to the fans of the series – probably because they are the only ones who are still watching. I really love Alice and the chemistry between her and Claire – and I guess it is not too far-fetched to indicate that there is some serious girlfriend-trope going on between the two. Of course, the first movie is still the best – nothing beats Michelle Rodriguez’ bad-assedness – but this one is a good homage to the whole series. The beginning is a little bumpy, though.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s